Glass Staircases and Glass Balustrades: The Next Big Thing or Here to Stay?

For staircase balustrades and stairs, glass has become the latest in-thing.

Glass is the most common material.

Glass is transparent, and its edges reflect light, adding to the simplicity of the material. Plate glass can be used to surround a balcony, terrace, or stairway in either horizontal or vertical sheets. Glass may be used in both residential and business settings. Glass provides an unrivalled sense of tranquillity by maximising light and vistas. It has a feel-good element due to its brilliance in bright sunlight.

Glass is here to stay, and it’s now more cheap than ever, bringing modernism and flair to the forefront.

Glass is no longer prohibitively expensive. Because of extensive study and development, it is now possible thanks to one word: simplification. The two new techniques of mounting toughened glass in these 10, 12, 15, or even 18mm are slot in or bolt on. Glass may now be installed on stairwells and landings. You may do it yourself with kits designed to suit existing stairs, or you can hire a professional to create a template for you.

The key is to keep things as basic as possible. This is now accessible for free.

1st System

Stainless steel fasteners should be used. These are available in a variety of thicknesses and may be pre-drilled to your specifications or templates. The glass is then secured to the sturdy fascias using 70mm screws. Fascias can be made of wood or concrete. Glass typically measures 600mm to 800mm broad by 1100mm high. Depending on the decision and available space, the glass is set back 10-70mm from the fascias.

The glass is toughened to a thickness of 10mm, with 12mm holes spaced 50mm and 150mm up to accept the stainless steel standoffs.

The stand offs have a diameter of 50mm and are made up of four parts: an exterior and inner face, a centre thread and a spacer, and two compressible washers. Brushing, polishing, and painting are all options. These function by holding the glass in place through an aperture with a bolt and washers on both sides, as well as a sleeve to locate it. To make the glass firm, the exterior face is tightened to a torque value.

A 50mm diameter slotted handrail with a 25mm recess for the glass to be fitted into a flexible insert is first attached into the timber, then the glass is installed. This permits the wood to expand and shrink against the glass’s stiff structure.

2nd System

The depth of the slot in system facia is determined by the depth of the floor, which is generally 250mm to 320mm. A 20mm down stand to provide for tolerance against the ceiling and an allowance above for flooring to butt up against. The glass is put into a 200mm deep hole in the timber, which is tightened with wedges before flexible adhesive is applied. The timber fascias are installed first, followed by the glass, which is wedged and bonded in place.

A 50mm diameter slotted handrail with a 25mm recess for the glass to be fitted into a flexible insert is first attached into the timber, then the glass is installed. This permits the wood to expand and shrink against the glass’s stiff structure.

The system is simple and quick to install, taking the danger out of a complex process.